Book Review: The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan

This book follows the cities and countries which fall on the infamous ancient Silk Road to explain the rise and fall of some of the world’s greatest empires, as well as how ideas and languages have travelled across the world.

As a result of its global scope and coverage, this book provides a firm grounding in international affairs and an understanding of today: Why are country relations as they are? Why do languages have commonalities? Why are economic inequalities as they are?

Guest Book Review: Linda Colley, The Gun, the Ship and the Pen (2021) @BuckysReviews

The Gun, the Ship and the Pen is an ambitious and far-reaching work of global history that places these foundational documents at the centre of its analysis.

Colley writes in an easy style that has the seasoned, lyrical quality of an experienced writer. Indeed, it is a surprisingly smooth read for what might otherwise be a very dense subject.

(Reblog) Book Review: What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Social Mobility? by Lee Elliott Major and Stephen Machin

In What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Social Mobility? Lee Elliott Major and Stephen Machin give an account of the long experience of social mobility in the UK, its barriers and a possible way out. Offering a strong base for those who are new to the subject and fresh viewpoints to those more well-versed in theContinue reading “(Reblog) Book Review: What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Social Mobility? by Lee Elliott Major and Stephen Machin”

Book Review: Political Order and Political Decay by Francis Fukuyama

This book explores how the state, its law, and its democracy, have developed over a series of historical events, and how in current times, the state of democracy has started to decay in today’s most developed democracies. This book is very much a classic in political theory and science and, especially with its focus on history, it is likely to be timeless. I would recommend this book to anyone studying or interested in political science, political theory, economics, and world history.

Book Review: Bullsh*t Jobs by David Graeber

This book is not a list of every type of pointless job. Instead, it provides a breakdown of why society has pointless jobs, how we got to this stage, and what we can do about it. It is deeply honest and revealing, sharing unspoken truths about the human condition, ultimately asking how we can reach human freedom.

(Reblog from @BuckysBookReviews): Sathnam Sanghera, Empireland (2021)

We may know well Britain’s impact on the world. We have all heard about how, given that it covered a quarter of the globe at its peak, the sun never set on the British Empire. Through empire, Britain spread its language, its customs, and its philosophies. It also spread fear, hatred, and death. While thisContinue reading “(Reblog from @BuckysBookReviews): Sathnam Sanghera, Empireland (2021)”

Book Review: The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream by Barack Obama

This book would be of particular interest to those interested in American politics, in Obama’s early career, and in some of America’s social and political areas of concern. Regardless of political leaning, it is interesting to see Obama’s perspectives on politics being formed at the earlier stages of his political career, as well as his growth before presidency.

⭐⭐⭐