Book Review: Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande

This book explored on a deeply philosophical level, what really matters at the end of life? How can we have a good death? By cleverly combining the science of medicine with the philosophy of life, Gawande explores how modern medicine has changed over time. He shares his personal story from his own family and personal life, as well as examples from his patients. This book confronts difficult conversations around death and human mortality up front.

Book Review: Do No Harm by Henry Marsh

This book is written by Henry Marsh who shares his unconventional journey into neurosurgery after studying medicine as a second degree. The title of the book is reminiscent of the first hippocratic oath, which is an oath often taken by medical physicians: “first do no harm”.

The book is littered with candid examples of his patients and his reflections, through his time in medical school to becoming a neurosurgeon. The book tries to address how to deal with the consequences if everything goes wrong, but this time in a life and death situation. It crosses the fields of philosophy, ethics, and medicine.

Book Review: Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker

Walker encourages the reader to feel empowered to protect their sleep and health. This is a science and evidence backed book about why humans sleep in the first place, even though sleeping is such a strange concept, and why sleep is so important to human survival and longevity. This book is a must-read.

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Book Review: Dear Life: A Doctor’s Story of Love and Loss by Rachel Clarke

This book is a must read for everyone. Rachel Clarke is a palliative care doctor, who worked as a journalist before retraining as a doctor. She shares her personal and professional journey with the reader through this transition and her eventual specialisation in palliative care.

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