Book Review: The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan

This book follows the cities and countries which fall on the infamous ancient Silk Road to explain the rise and fall of some of the world’s greatest empires, as well as how ideas and languages have travelled across the world.

As a result of its global scope and coverage, this book provides a firm grounding in international affairs and an understanding of today: Why are country relations as they are? Why do languages have commonalities? Why are economic inequalities as they are?

Book Review: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

“It is only a slight exaggeration to say that happiness is the experience of spending time with people you love and who love you.”

This is a very comprehensive book that takes you through different models of thinking and perception. It will help you to understand basic psychological theory and how to tap into your own intuition to use it effectively in daily life, such as for making decisions.

Book Review: Meditations by Marcus Aurelius

I am normally a bit sceptical of ancient philosophy books. However, I was pleasantly surprised with this one. This short and sweet book is full of practical wisdom and little reminders for when things feel too much, such you should “consider anything that is humanly possible and appropriate to lie within your reach”.

Book Review: Political Order and Political Decay by Francis Fukuyama

This book explores how the state, its law, and its democracy, have developed over a series of historical events, and how in current times, the state of democracy has started to decay in today’s most developed democracies. This book is very much a classic in political theory and science and, especially with its focus on history, it is likely to be timeless. I would recommend this book to anyone studying or interested in political science, political theory, economics, and world history.

Book Review: Bullsh*t Jobs by David Graeber

This book is not a list of every type of pointless job. Instead, it provides a breakdown of why society has pointless jobs, how we got to this stage, and what we can do about it. It is deeply honest and revealing, sharing unspoken truths about the human condition, ultimately asking how we can reach human freedom.

Book Review: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

What is your personality type? How can you be an inclusive leader? These are only a couple of the questions that Susan Cain addresses in this empowering book. Cain dispels myths about having an introverted personality type to change society’s perception of what it means to be introverted. This book would be of most interest to all those who are aspiring to be inclusive leaders, as well as those interested in personality and psychology.

(Reblog from @BuckysBookReviews): Five Key Take-Aways from JS Mill, On Liberty

To round off my read-along of John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty, I will reflect here upon the five key things I have taken away from this book in this reading. I won’t go over every point that I have raised during the read-along: if you want my thoughts in more detail, please revisit parts oneContinue reading “(Reblog from @BuckysBookReviews): Five Key Take-Aways from JS Mill, On Liberty”